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The Construction of the Piano

The Legs

The Legs

Treble, Bass, & Point

Three legs support the piano:

  • The bass leg is the leg on the bass (left) side of the keyboard
  • The treble leg is the leg on the treble (right) side of the keyboard
  • The point leg is the leg on the end opposite the keyboard
The treble and bass legs are attached to the bottom of the keybed, and the point leg is attached to a small platform that is found under the tail of the piano. The legs of the piano must be sturdy in order to support the full weight of the instrument which can weigh over 1000 pounds. The legs are made of solid wood - usually a hardwood such as birch or maple.

Leg Detail

The Ferrule & Caster

On many pianos, the wood at the bottom of each leg is slightly flared out. This wider portion of wood is called the ferrule. The wheels that may be attached to the bottom of each leg are called casters, and these allow the instrument to be moved with greater ease.

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